Response of sugarcane genotypes to varying planting environments under two distinct agro-climatic zones of Punjab, India


Abstract views: 67 / PDF downloads: 60

Authors

  • Sudhir Kumar Mishra PUNJAB AGRICULTURAL UNIVERSITY, REGIONAL STATION, FARIDKOT- 151203 (PUNJAB) https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0567-3058
  • Jashandeep Singh PUNJAB AGRICULTURAL UNIVERSITY, REGIONAL STATION, FARIDKOT- 151203 (PUNJAB)
  • Kuldeep Singh PUNJAB AGRICULTURAL UNIVERSITY, REGIONAL STATION, FARIDKOT- 151203 (PUNJAB)
  • Harkanwaljot Singh Punjab Agricultural University, Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Moga-142002 Punjab, India.
  • Pavneet Kaur Kingra Professor & Head, Department of Climate Change & Agricultural Meteorology, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana-141004, India.
  • Vikrant Singh Punjab Agricultural University, Regional Research Station, Gurdaspur - 143521 (Punjab)
  • Barun Biswas Punjab Agricultural University, Regional Research Station, Gurdaspur - 143521 (Punjab)

https://doi.org/10.37580/JSR.2022.1.12.75-84

Abstract

Sugarcane, an important sugar producing crop provides raw materials for sugar industries hence, creates employment for the human population. In India, sugarcane planting has large sowing window starting from autumn (October-November) to spring season (February- March/April). To determine the optimum planting time of sugarcane cultivars, a field experiment was conducted during 2017-18 at two diverse locations (Faridkot and Gurdaspur) of Punjab, in split plot design having three planting dates (February 25th, March 25th and April 25th) in main plots and four sugarcane cultivars (CoPb 91, CoJ 88, Co 0118 and Co 0238) in sub-plots with 3 replications. Results described that the sugarcane crop planted on February 25 produced more tillers that resulted in maximum millable canes (i.e., 113.8 '000 / ha at Faridkot and 107.3 '000 / ha at Gurdaspur, respectively). At both sites, maximum cane yield of 128.4 and 136.3 t / ha was recorded under the February 25 planted crop, which was 15.5 and 18.4 % more than March 25 and 31.2 and 36.9% higher than the April 25 planted crop, respectively. At both locations, the higher cane yield (128.4 and 136.3 t / ha) under February 25 planted crop might be attributed to improved yield parameters such as more millable canes (113.8 and 107.3'000/ha), higher single cane weight (1.2 and 1.4kg) and better quality attributes viz., extraction (55.9 and 56.1%), brix (18.5 and 18.6%), sucrose (16.5 and 16.8%), purity (89.3 and 90.5%) and commercial cane sugar (11.5 and 11.8%). Stable sugarcane yield of Co 0238 was obtained in agro climatic zone II, while CoJ 88 was very uniform in agro climatic zone IV, so these varieties can be selected for cultivation in respective agro climatic zones of Punjab. Therefore, variety CoJ 88 is suitable for Faridkot and Co 0238 for Gurdaspur. In contrast, Co 0118 showed very inconsistent performance at both regions.

Author Biography

  • Sudhir Kumar Mishra, PUNJAB AGRICULTURAL UNIVERSITY, REGIONAL STATION, FARIDKOT- 151203 (PUNJAB)

    AGROMETEOROLOGIST, DEPT. OF AGROMETEOROLOGY, PUNJAB AGRICULTURAL UNIVERSITY, REGIONAL RESEARCH STATION, FARIDKOT- 151203 (PUNJAB)

References

Ahmed M, Rahman F. 2014. Changing paradigms in regulating and deregulating the sugar pricing mechanism in India. Journal of Management. 5: 77-86.

Anonymous 2022. Package of Practices for Crops of Punjab (Kharif 2022). https://www.pau.edu/content/ccil/pf/pp_kharif.pdf.

Fageria NK, Virupax C, Baligar CA, Jones JW. 2010. Growth and mineral nutrition of field crops. 3rd Edn. CRC Press. Pp: 247-52.

Gupta AP. 1977. Method for assessment of sugarcane quality. Indian Journal of Agricultural Research. 4: 87-88.

Marin FR, Jones JW, Singels A, Royce F, Assad ED, Pellegrino Q, Justino F. 2013. Climate change impacts on sugarcane attainable yield in southern Brazil. Climatic Change.117: 227–239. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-012-0561-y

Meade GP, Chen JCP. 1977. Cane Sugar Hand Book. Edn. 10. John Wiley & Sons, New York.

Mishra SK, Singh G, Singh K. 2016. Sugarcane growth and yield simulation under varying planting dates in sub-tropical India. Journal of Agrometeorology. 19: 200-204.

Nevase VB, Thoart ST, Jamble AS, Jadhav MG,Ramteke JR. 2004. Effect of times of planting on the cane yield of sugarcane varieties. Journal of Agrometeorology. 6:85-87.

Pandey MB, Shukla SK. 2003. Growth-cum tillering pattern and its effect on productivity of sugarcane (Saccharum spp. Hybrid complex) genotypes under different planting seasons and nitrogen levels in subtropical India. Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences. 73: 23-28.

Samui RP, Kulkarni PS, Kamble MV, Vaidya NG. 2013. A critical evaluation of sugarcane yield variation as influenced by climatic parameters in Uttar Pradesh and Maharashtra states of India. Journal of Agricultural Science. 2: 63-69.

Satisha GC, Krishnappa M, Srikanth K. 1996. Input of sulphur on yield and quality of sugar cane. Indian Sugar 45: 397-401

Shiv K, Srivastava SNL. 1993. Response of sugarcane genotypes to planting dates and their effect on succeeding ratoon cane. Indian Sugar. 43: 101-104.

Singels A, Smith MA. 2002. The effect of row spacing on an irrigated plant crop of sugarcane variety NCo376. Proc: South African Sugar Technologists Association. 76: 94-105.

Singh H, Mishra SK, Singh K, Singh K, Pal RK, Gill KK, Kingra PK. 2021. Simulating the impact of climate change on sugarcane production in Punjab . Journal of Agrometeorology. 23: 292-98. https://doi.org/10.54386/jam.v23i3.31.

Singh J, Mishra SK, Kingra PK, Singh K, Biswas B, Singh V. 2018. Evaluation of DSSATCANEGRO model for phenology and yield attributes of sugarcane grown in different agroclimatic zones of Punjab, India. Journal of Agrometeorology. 20: 280-85.

Singh K, Mishra SK, Singh RS. 2017. Performance of sugarcane genotype grown under varying weather conditions in south western Punjab. Journal of Agrometeorology. 19: 81-91.

Singh K, Mishra SK, Singh V. 2019. Sugarcane and wheat productivity under different cropping systems. Sugar Tech. 21: 415-20. https:// doi.org/10.1007/s12355-018-00697-3.

Solomon S. 2016. Sugarcane production and development of sugar industry in India”. Sugar Tech. 18: 588-602.

Tripathi SC, Pandey DS. 1993. Effect of planting dates on yield and quality of sugarcane (Saccharum sp.) varieties. Indian Journal of Agronomy. 38: 339-40.

Verma A. 2015. The Indian Sugar Industry: Current Status & Way Forward. Ind. Sugar Mills Assoc. New Delhi. www.indiansugar. com/PDFS/IBA_19_Sept_2015_Final.pdf.

Verma RS, Shukla SK, Singh GB, Lal J. 1996. Agrotechniques to enhance sugar productivity of mid late varieties for early crushing. Indian Journal of Agricultural Research. 11: 38-41.

Downloads

Submitted

16-12-2022

Published

27-08-2023

How to Cite

Response of sugarcane genotypes to varying planting environments under two distinct agro-climatic zones of Punjab, India. (2023). Journal of Sugarcane Research, 12(1), 75-84. https://doi.org/10.37580/JSR.2022.1.12.75-84
Citation