Dynamics of biomass and soil carbon sequestration across an age-sequence of Lawsonia inermis plantation in semi-arid Region, Rajasthan, India


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Authors

  • DIPAK KUMAR GUPTA ICAR-IARI, Jharkhand
  • KEERTHIKA A central arid zone research institute,jodhpur
  • M B NOOR MOHAMED ICAR, CAZRI, RRS, Pali
  • R K BHATT ICAR-CAZRI, Jodhpur
  • A K SHUKLA ICAR-CAZRI, RRS, Pali
  • PRAVEEN KUMAR ICAR-CAZRI, Jodhpur
  • KAMLA K CHOUDHARY ICAR-CAZRI, RRS, PALI
  • R S MEHTA ICAR-CAZRI, RRS, Pali
  • S R MEENA ICAR-CAZRI, RRS, Pali
  • P L REGAR ICAR-CAZRI, RRS, Pali

https://doi.org/10.56093/ijas.v92i6.104699

Keywords:

Allometric equation, Biomass, Carbon stock, Ratooning, Shoot pruning

Abstract

Lawsonia inermis L. (Henna) is a perennial shrub cultivated as a ratoon crop in the hot semi-arid regions of India
mainly for its dye-containing leaves. Considering its perennial nature, it was hypothesized that Henna plantation may sequester carbon and severe shoot pruning may affect the distribution of carbon in the above and belowground biomass. Therefore, biomass and soil carbon stock in an age-sequence of 2-, 13-, 21- and 56-year old Henna plantation was quantified to study the dynamics and patterns of carbon accumulation. The study was undertaken at ICAR- Central Arid Zone Research Institute, Regional Research Station, Pali, Rajasthan during 2017–18. Biomass and soil carbon stock significantly increased with the age of the plantation. While shoot pruning and plant populations significantly affected the distribution of carbon in the above ground and belowground biomass as well as in the soil. Within the plant system, belowground biomass stored more carbon as compared to aboveground biomass whereas, within the soil, carbon stock was higher in the lower soil layer (15–45 cm) as compared to the surface soil layer (0–15 cm). The 2-, 13-, 21- and 56-year old plantation stored about 1.60±0.44, 10.13±1.28, 10.14±1.02 and 11.42±2.50 mg biomass-C per ha respectively, with a higher rate of sequestration during early stages of the plantation.

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Author Biographies

  • DIPAK KUMAR GUPTA, ICAR-IARI, Jharkhand

    Scientist (Environmental Science)

  • KEERTHIKA A, central arid zone research institute,jodhpur

    Scientist (Agroforestry)

  • M B NOOR MOHAMED, ICAR, CAZRI, RRS, Pali

    Scientist (Agroforestry)

  • R K BHATT, ICAR-CAZRI, Jodhpur

    Retired Principal Scientist

  • A K SHUKLA, ICAR-CAZRI, RRS, Pali

    Principal Scientist (Horticulture)

  • PRAVEEN KUMAR, ICAR-CAZRI, Jodhpur

    Principal scientist (Soil science)

  • KAMLA K CHOUDHARY, ICAR-CAZRI, RRS, PALI

    Scientist (Soil science)

  • R S MEHTA, ICAR-CAZRI, RRS, Pali

    Principal Scientist (Agronomy)

  • S R MEENA, ICAR-CAZRI, RRS, Pali

    Scientist (Agronomy)

  • P L REGAR, ICAR-CAZRI, RRS, Pali

    Scientist (SG), Soil and Water Conservation Engineering

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Submitted

2020-09-11

Published

2022-01-28

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Articles

How to Cite

GUPTA, D. K., A, K., MOHAMED, M. B. N., BHATT, R. K., SHUKLA, A. K., KUMAR, P., CHOUDHARY, K. K., MEHTA, R. S., MEENA, S. R., & REGAR, P. L. (2022). Dynamics of biomass and soil carbon sequestration across an age-sequence of Lawsonia inermis plantation in semi-arid Region, Rajasthan, India. The Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 92(6), 705-710. https://doi.org/10.56093/ijas.v92i6.104699
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