Immobilization of arsenic in soil using modified bentonite and red mud to reduce its bio-availability in Brassica juncea


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Authors

  • SIYARAM MEENA ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi, 110 012, India
  • KAPIL ATMARAM CHOBHE ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi, 110 012, India
  • KANCHIKERI MATH MANJAIAH ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi, 110 012, India
  • SIBA PRASAD DATTA ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh
  • DEBASIS GOLUI North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota, USA

https://doi.org/10.56093/ijas.v93i9.139141

Keywords:

Arsenic, Bio-availability, Clay minerals, Brassica juncea, Red mud

Abstract

The influence of modified clay mineral and red mud on biological yield and arsenic bioavailability to mustard were investigated. The total biomass of the mustard was increased by application of clay mineral and red mud products. At higher doses (5.00 g/kg), Fe-bentonite treated soil recorded the highest total plant biomass (11.2 g/pot). DMSO-bentonite (1.23 mg/kg) and Fe-bentonite (1.28 mg/kg) were proved to be most effective in reducing the extractable arsenic concentration in soil at the rate of 5.00 g/kg doses. These products also help in lowering the hazard quotient (0.20–0.08) values for human consumption of arsenic through mustard leaf. This means that modified types of bentonites and red mud boost mustard productivity by reducing arsenic concentration.

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Author Biographies

  • KAPIL ATMARAM CHOBHE, ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi, 110 012, India

     

     

  • KANCHIKERI MATH MANJAIAH, ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi, 110 012, India

     

     

  • SIBA PRASAD DATTA, ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh

     

     

  • DEBASIS GOLUI, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota, USA

     

     

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Submitted

2023-07-11

Published

2023-09-26

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Short-Communication

How to Cite

MEENA, S., CHOBHE, K. A., MANJAIAH, K. M., DATTA, S. P., & GOLUI, D. (2023). Immobilization of arsenic in soil using modified bentonite and red mud to reduce its bio-availability in Brassica juncea. The Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 93(9), 1049–1052. https://doi.org/10.56093/ijas.v93i9.139141
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