Early growth and productivity of fast-growing fodder trees on a typical smallholder farm boundary in Central Kerala


Abstract views: 44 / PDF downloads: 50

Authors

  • AKASH RAVINDRA CHICHAGHARE Kerala Agricultural University, Thrissur, India https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9704-9879
  • Dr. Asha K. Raj Department of Silviculture and Agroforestry, Kerala Agricultural University, Thrissur-680656, India
  • Dr. T. K. Kunhamu Department of Silviculture and Agroforestry, Kerala Agricultural University, Thrissur-680656, India
  • Dr. Jamaludheen V. Department of Silviculture and Agroforestry, Kerala Agricultural University, Thrissur-680656, India

Keywords:

calliandra, Anthocephalus cadamba, Neolamrckia cadamba, crude protein, Fodder bank, gliricidia, hedge row, mulberry

Abstract

Animal husbandry in Kerala is constrained due to the protein deficit, making farmers rely on costly concentrates which severely reduces their profit. Cultivation of fodder bank trees on boundaries of smallholder’s farm can be better alternative to concentrates in land-scarce Kerala. Thus, this study was undertaken to evaluate the growth, productivity and nutritive value of fodder trees on a smallholder’s farm boundaries of in Thrissur, Kerala. Five species (Morus indica, Neolamarckia cadamba, Calliandra calothyrsus, Sesbania grandiflora, and Gliricidia sepium planted with a spacing of 45 × 45 cm on four (replication) sides of the farm in RBD. Each treatment was maintained at 1m height and harvested after every two months in rainy season and three months in summer season into leaf and edible stem fraction. Fresh fodder yield, fodder dry matter yield and protein yield recorded and analysed by ANOVA using SPSS at 5% significance level. After one year of planting, highest survival was observed in Calliandra (98.25%), Morus indica (96.5%) and N. cadamba (87.5%). highest fresh leaf fodder (1.36 Mg ha-1), fresh stem fodder (0.69 Mg ha-1) and total fresh fodder yield (2.05 Mg ha-1) obtained in Neolamarckia followed by Calliandra, Morus, Gliricidia, and Sesbania respectively. However, in terms of total dry matter yield Calliandra (0.51 Mg ha-1) and Neolamarckia (0.39 Mg ha-1) performed better followed by mulberry. Highest Crude Protein (CP) yield was obtained in Calliandra followed by Neolamarckia, Morus and Gliricidia, and Sesbania respectively. highest total Crude protein per centas recorded in Calliandra (19.26%), Gliricidia (18.59%) and mulberry (18.25%). The lowest fodder yield in Sesbania pertains to its lower survival after sub-quent cuttings. Planting Neolamarckia, Calliandra and Morus on the boundaries of the farm can provide much-needed protein and high-quality feed, enabling sustainable and affordable animal production

Author Biographies

  • AKASH RAVINDRA CHICHAGHARE, Kerala Agricultural University, Thrissur, India

    Research scholar at Depart. of silviculture and agroforestry,

     
  • Dr. Asha K. Raj, Department of Silviculture and Agroforestry, Kerala Agricultural University, Thrissur-680656, India

    Assistant Professor

  • Dr. T. K. Kunhamu, Department of Silviculture and Agroforestry, Kerala Agricultural University, Thrissur-680656, India

    Head and Professor 

  • Dr. Jamaludheen V., Department of Silviculture and Agroforestry, Kerala Agricultural University, Thrissur-680656, India

    Professor 

Submitted

03-02-2023

Published

26-12-2023

How to Cite

Early growth and productivity of fast-growing fodder trees on a typical smallholder farm boundary in Central Kerala. (2023). Indian Journal of Agroforestry, 25(2). https://epubs.icar.org.in/index.php/IJA/article/view/132914

Most read articles by the same author(s)