Depthwise variation in selected soil properties as influenced by tillage and residue management in sandy loam soil of North-West Himalayas, India


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Authors

  • SHARMISTHA PAL scientist, ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Research Centre, Chandigarh
  • R P YADAV Ministry of Agriculture & Farmers Welfare, Krishi Bhawan, New Delhi
  • S L ARYA P.S, scientist, ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Research Centre, Chandigarh
  • SATHIYA K scientist, ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Research Centre, Chandigarh
  • P L BHUTIA ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Research Centre, Chandigarh 160 019, India

https://doi.org/10.56093/ijas.v92i8.102271

Keywords:

Brown manuring, carbon fractions, conservation tillage, soil aggregation

Abstract

 The present study aimed to determine the effect of varying tillage and residue management in a sandy loam soil under maize (Zea mays L.)-wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) sequence. The research was carried out at ICAR- Indian Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Research Centre, Chandigarh, research farm, located at Panchkula, Haryana, in maize (kharif)-wheat (rabi) cropping sequence during 2009–2017. Six treatments implemented were Conventional tillage (CT); Deep tillage once in three years (DT); Conventional tillage with integrated nutrient management (CT-INM); Conventional tillage with brown manuring in maize + cowpea (1:2) and wheat + pea (4:1) ratio (CT-BM); Conservation tillage (CST) ; Conservation tillage with brown manuring (CST-BM). The compaction level attained under conservation tillage based systems were lower than the corresponding levels in the conventional tillage control. The highest percentage of macro aggregates was found in CST-BM treatment (48%), followed by CST (45%) and CT, DT and CT-INM recorded much lesser macro aggregate (29.3, 28 and 31%). Conventional tillage (CT) reduced macroaggregates with a concomitant increase in microaggregates (<0.25 mm) percentage. The mean soil moisture percentage average in surface (0–15 cm) and sub surface soil (15–30 cm) were found to be higher under DT, CST and CST-BM treatments over CT and CT-INM treatments. In general, the soil moisture was found to be proportional to the amount of biomass added under various treatments. The mean soil available nitrogen were 15.4% and 17.5% higher under CT-BM and CST-BM treatments respectively, over the control (CT).

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Author Biographies

  • SHARMISTHA PAL, scientist, ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Research Centre, Chandigarh

    scientist, ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Research Centre, Chandigarh

  • R P YADAV, Ministry of Agriculture & Farmers Welfare, Krishi Bhawan, New Delhi

    Consultant, Ministry of Agriculture & Farmers Welfare, Krishi Bhawan, New Delhi

  • S L ARYA, P.S, scientist, ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Research Centre, Chandigarh

    P.S, scientist, ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Research Centre, Chandigarh

  • SATHIYA K, scientist, ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Research Centre, Chandigarh

    scientist, ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Research Centre, Chandigarh

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Submitted

2020-07-12

Published

2022-04-18

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Articles

How to Cite

PAL, S., YADAV, R. P., ARYA, S. L., K, S., & BHUTIA, P. L. (2022). Depthwise variation in selected soil properties as influenced by tillage and residue management in sandy loam soil of North-West Himalayas, India. The Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 92(8), 978-981. https://doi.org/10.56093/ijas.v92i8.102271
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