Organic farming: assessment of the perception of practicing tribal farmers in Jharkhand

Authors

  • BRIJESH PANDEY Divyayan Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Morabadi, Ranchi, Jharkhand 834 008, India
  • AJEET KUMAR SINGH Divyayan Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Morabadi, Ranchi, Jharkhand 834 008, India
  • NIDHI SINGH Divyayan Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Morabadi, Ranchi, Jharkhand 834 008, India
  • NEHA RAJAN Divyayan Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Morabadi, Ranchi, Jharkhand 834 008, India
  • ANJANI KUMAR Divyayan Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Morabadi, Ranchi, Jharkhand 834 008, India
  • RAVINDRA KUMAR SINGH Divyayan Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Morabadi, Ranchi, Jharkhand 834 008, India
  • KESHAVA Divyayan Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Morabadi, Ranchi, Jharkhand 834 008, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.56093/ijas.v92i6.107681

Keywords:

Attitudinal Belief, Control Belief, General Belief, Organic Farming

Abstract

Organic farming aims to produce healthy and non-toxic food for consumers using natural inputs to eliminate any
substance from farming system which is harmful to human as well as soil health. Organic farming is not a new concept but a traditional farming system with modern scientific techniques. Realizing the long-term positive impact of organic farming, Government of India is also promoting the organic farming on a large scale. In line with this, three villages of Angara block of Ranchi District have been developed as fully organic villages. To assess the general, attitudinal and control belief among tribal farmers towards organic farming, a study was conducted in two Participatory Guarantee System (PGS) certified villages namely Dhurleta and Budhakocha of Ranchi district in Jharkhand state during the year 2019–20. Data for the study was collected through personal interview of the tribal farmers practicing organic farming using structured interview schedule developed for the purpose. A total of 50 farmers (25 farmers from each village) selected through systematic random sampling method formed the sample of the study. Findings of the study showed that about 76.80% farmers believed that organic farming is good while 61% of the respondents had favourable attitudinal belief towards organic farming. Majority of the population agreed that disease, pest control, marketing and complexity in certification are the major setbacks in large scale adoption of organic farming.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Araujo A S F, Santos V B and Monteiro R T R. 2008. Responses of soil microbial biomass and activity for practice of organic and conventional farming systems in Piaui state, Brazil. European Journal of Soil Biology 44: 225–30.

Assis K and Mohd Ismail H A. 2011. Knowledge, attitude and practices of farmers towards organic farming. International Journal for Economics and Research 2(3): 1–6.

Bhardwaj M and Dhiman M. 2019. Growth and performance of organic farming in India: what could be the future prospects? Journal of Current Science 20: 1–8.

Das S, Chatterjee A and Pal T K. 2020. Organic farming in India: a vision towards a healthy nation. Food Quality and Safety 4(2): 69–76.

Deshmukh M S and Babar N. 2015. Present status and prospects of organic farming in India. European Academic Research 3(4): 4271–87.

Eyhorn F, Ramakrishnan M and Mader P. 2007. The viability of cotton-based organic farming systems in India. International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability 5: 25–38.

Farmer J, Epstein G, Watkins S and Mincey S. 2014. Organic farming in West Virginia: a behavioral approach. Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development 4: 155–71.

Ghosh M K, Sohel M H, Nazmin A, Zahara F T, Nur S B and Hasan M M. 2019. Farmers attitude towards organic farming: a case study in Chapainawabganj district. Asian Journal of Advances in Agricultural Research 10(2): 1–7.

Likert R. 1932. A technique for the measurement of attitudes. Archives of Psychology 22(140): 1–55.

Marsh L, Zoumenou V, Cotton C and Hashem F. 2017. Organic farming: knowledge, practices, and views of limited resource farmers and non-farmers on the Delmarva Peninsula. Organic Agriculture 7: 125–132.

Mukherjee A, Kapoor A and Dutta S. 2018. Organic food business in India: a survey of companies. Research in Economics and Management 3: 72.

Panneerselvam P, Halberg N, Vaarst M and Hermansen J E. 2012. Indian farmers’ experience with and perceptions of organic farming. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems 27(2): 157–69.

Rana S, Hasan M H, Alam M S and Islam M S. 2017. Farmer attitude towards organic vegetable cultivation in Rangunia Upazila, Chittagong, Bangladesh. Journal of Bioscience and Agriculture Research 14(01): 1151–56.

Salawat N, Hasan S S, Khan A S, Rahman M S, Hoque M M and Moonmoon M. 2013. Study on knowledge and attitude of mushroom growers at selected upazilas of Dhaka. Bangladesh Journal of Mushroom 7(1): 49–57.

Sarker M A, Itohara Y and Hoque M. 2010. Determinants of adoption decisions: The case of organic farming in Bangladesh. Extension Farming Systems Journal 5(2): 39–46.

Stofferahn C W. 2009. Personal, farm and value orientations in conversion to organic farming. Journal of Sustainable Agriculture 33: 862–84.

Downloads

Published

2022-01-18

Issue

Section

Articles

How to Cite

PANDEY, B., SINGH, A. K., SINGH, N., RAJAN, N., KUMAR, A., SINGH, R. K., & KESHAVA. (2022). Organic farming: assessment of the perception of practicing tribal farmers in Jharkhand. The Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 92(6), 711-715. https://doi.org/10.56093/ijas.v92i6.107681
Citation