Molecular characterization and multi-environmental evaluation of field corn (Zea mays) inbreds for kernel traits


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Authors

  • CHETHAN KUMAR V ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi 110 012, India
  • R N GADAG ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi 110 012, India
  • GANAPATI MUKRI ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi 110 012, India
  • JAYANT S BHAT ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi 110 012, India
  • CHANDU SINGH ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi 110 012, India
  • JYOTI KUMARI ICAR-National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, New Delhi
  • RAJIV K SINGH ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi 110 012, India
  • NAVIN C GUPTA ICAR-National Institute of Plant Biotechnology, New Delhi

https://doi.org/10.56093/ijas.v91i11.118545

Keywords:

AMMI analysis, Gene based markers, Kernel size, Kernel weight, Molecular diversity

Abstract

Kernel size and kernel weight are important yield attributing traits in maize (Zea mays L.). Though yield hascomplex inheritance, understanding and improvement of yield per se becomes relatively easy, when maize breedingis targeted for genetic enhancement of yield component traits. In the present investigation, a set of 45 tropical fieldcorn inbred lines were evaluated under three environments and at different location for kernel length, kernel thicknessand kernel weight traits. In a given location, environmental influence on the expression of these traits were negligibleas it was evident by exhibition of high heritability (broad sense) for the traits under study, however pooled effect ofenvironments showed some interactions. Based on the AMMI stability value, the inbred lines AI 04 followed by AI 37,AI 18, AI 25 and AI 35 were selected as highly stable genotypes for its yield per se. Inbred lines were characterizedusing gene-based markers linked to kernel traits. It was observed that molecular markers rightly classified the inbredlines into different groups based on their trait means. Furthermore, the makers, umc1890 and umc1120 were putativelylinked to kernel weight and kernel thickness respectively. These markers may be utilized for identification of suitabledonor and genetic improvement of kernel traits driven maize improvement program.

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Submitted

2021-12-01

Published

2021-12-02

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Articles

How to Cite

V, C. K., GADAG, R. N., MUKRI, G., BHAT, J. S., SINGH, C., KUMARI, J., SINGH, R. K., & GUPTA, N. C. (2021). Molecular characterization and multi-environmental evaluation of field corn (Zea mays) inbreds for kernel traits. The Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 91(11), 1622–1626. https://doi.org/10.56093/ijas.v91i11.118545
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