Insights on ownership pattern and demand for machinery in Indian agriculture


Abstract views: 302 / PDF downloads: 75

Authors

  • ANKITA KANDPAL ICAR-National Institute of Agricultural Economics and Policy Research, Pusa, New Delhi 110 012
  • AMIT KAR ICAR-National Institute of Agricultural Economics and Policy Research, Pusa, New Delhi 110 012
  • KINGSLY IMMANUELRAJ ICAR-National Institute of Agricultural Economics and Policy Research, Pusa, New Delhi 110 012
  • ALKA SINGH ICAR-National Institute of Agricultural Economics and Policy Research, Pusa, New Delhi 110 012
  • GIRISH KUMAR JHA ICAR-National Institute of Agricultural Economics and Policy Research, Pusa, New Delhi 110 012
  • PREMLATA SINGH ICAR-National Institute of Agricultural Economics and Policy Research, Pusa, New Delhi 110 012

https://doi.org/10.56093/ijas.v92i1.120880

Keywords:

Factor substitution, Mechanization index, SURE, Translog cost function

Abstract

As the wage rate for labour escalates in agriculture, farmers opt for other power alternatives. Mechanization of farms provides an opportunity to overcome the issue of labour scarcity and rising cost of production besides facilitating timely farm operations thereby increasing yield and farmer’s income. An examination of existing level of mechanization across the states in different crops is computed during 2018 using mechanization index for 2001–02 and 2013–14. The study concludes that the extent of mechanization is not uniform across crops and states. Wheat is the most mechanized crop and Punjab shows highest level of mechanization in the farms. The factor demand elasticity estimates confirm that change in market prices of inputs significantly affect the machinery usage in paddy and wheat. Substitution elasticities also indicate substitution between machine labour and human labour in major crops during 1996–2013.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Bezlepkina I V, Lansink A G J M and Oskam A J. 2005. Effects of subsidies in Russian dairy farming. Agricultural Economics 33: 277–88.

Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI). 2015. Labour in Indian agriculture: A growing challenge. http://ficci.in/spdocument/20550/FICCI-agri-Report%2009- 03-2015.pdf.

Khalil A M. 2005. A Cross Section Estimate of Translog Production Function: Jordanian Manufacturing Industry, Topics in Middle Eastern and North African Economies, Electronic Journal 7, Middle East Economic Association and Loyola University Chicago.

Kumar P, Shinoj P, Raju S S, Kumar A, Rich K M and Msangi S. 2010. Factor Demand, Output Supply Elasticities and Supply Projections for Major Crops of India. Agricultural Economics Research Review 23: 1–14.

Meena P C, Kumar P and Reddy G P. 2010. Factor demand and output supply of wheat in western India. Indian Journal of Agricultural Economics 65(4): 739–46.

Mehta C R, Chandel N S, Senthilkumar T and Singh K K. 2014. Trends of agricultural mechanization in India. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), Policy Brief (2). Beijing, China: United Nations Centre for Sustainable Agricultural Mechanization.

Mukherjee S and Pradhan K C. 2016. Anatomy of input demand functions for Indian farmers across regions. Madras School of Economics, Working Paper 150.

Rasouli F, Sadighi H and Minaei S. 2009. Factors affecting agricultural mechanization: A case study on sunflower seed farms in Iran. Journal of Agricultural Science and Technology 11: 39–48.

Singh G. 2015. Agricultural mechanization development in India. Indian Journal of Agricultural Economics 70(1): 64–82.

Singh G. 2006. Estimation of a mechanization index and its impact on production and economic factors: A case study in India. Biosystems Engineering 93(1): 99–106.

Srivastava S K, Chand R and Singh J. 2017. Changing crop production cost in India: Input prices, substitution and technological effects. Agricultural Economics Research Review 30: 171–82.

Wijetunga C S. 2016. Rice production structures in Sri Lanka: The normalized translog profit function approach. Asian Journal of Agriculture and Rural Development 6(2): 21–35.

Downloads

Submitted

2022-01-31

Published

2022-01-31

Issue

Section

Articles

How to Cite

KANDPAL, A., KAR, A., IMMANUELRAJ, K., SINGH, A., JHA, G. K., & SINGH, P. (2022). Insights on ownership pattern and demand for machinery in Indian agriculture. The Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 92(1), 18-21. https://doi.org/10.56093/ijas.v92i1.120880
Citation