Effect of herbicides on distribution and interference of weeds, growth and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum) in Kandahar, Afghanistan

Authors

  • SUMAN SEN Afghanistan National Agricultural Science and Technology University (ANASTU), Kandahar, Afghanistan
  • Y K ZIAR Afghanistan National Agricultural Science and Technology University (ANASTU), Kandahar, Afghanistan
  • T K DAS Afghanistan National Agricultural Science and Technology University (ANASTU), Kandahar, Afghanistan
  • RISHI RAJ Afghanistan National Agricultural Science and Technology University (ANASTU), Kandahar, Afghanistan

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.56093/ijas.v92i5.124623

Keywords:

Broad-leaved weeds, Isoproturon, Narrow-leaved weeds, Sulfosulfuron, Weed control efficiency

Abstract

Weeds are the major constraint to achieving higher wheat yield in Afghanistan. To evaluate weed interference and its impact on wheat, a field experiment was undertaken during winter season in 2014–15 at Afghanistan National Agricultural Science and Technology University (ANASTU), Kandahar. Seven weed control treatments comprising isoproturon 0.75 and 1.0 kg/ha at 35 days after sowing (DAS), sulfosulfuron 20 and 25 g/ha at 35 DAS, isoproturon + 2,4-D 0.75 + 0.5 kg/ha at 35 DAS (tank-mix), weed-free check and weedy check were laid out in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Results showed that grassy weeds constituted 62.7% of the total weeds and were mostly dominant. All herbicides/weed control treatments influenced weed interference, wheat crop
growth and yield significantly. Sulfosulfuron 25 g/ha at 35 DAS resulted in significant reduction in weed density by 95.2% (i.e. weed control efficiency) and dry weight by 95.1% (i.e. weed control index), respectively. This treatment led to significant improvements in wheat growth (Leaf area index, dry matter accumulation) and grain (4.6 t/ha) and biological yields (10.6 t/ha), and was superior to other herbicide treatments. It increased wheat grain and biological yields by 24.3% and 17.8%, respectively, compared to weedy check. Therefore, the application of sulfosulfuron 25 g/ha at 35 DAS may be recommended for better weed control and higher wheat yield in Kandahar, Afghanistan, and in similar agro-ecologies of the tropics and sub-tropics.

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References

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Published

2022-06-14

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Articles

How to Cite

SEN, S. ., ZIAR, Y. K. ., DAS, T. K. ., & RAJ, R. . (2022). Effect of herbicides on distribution and interference of weeds, growth and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum) in Kandahar, Afghanistan. The Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 92(5), 563-566. https://doi.org/10.56093/ijas.v92i5.124623
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