Assessment of Crop Water Demand and Irrigation Water Supply in a Run-off-the-river Based Canal System

Authors

  • ABINASH DALAI Swami Vivekanand College of Agricultural Engineering & Technology and Research Station Indira Gandhi Krishi Vishwavidyalaya, Raipur - 492 012, Chhattisgarh, India
  • ATMARAM MISHRA ICAR-Indian Institute of Water Management, Bhubaneswar - 751 023, Odisha, India
  • MAHENDRA PRASAD TRIPATHI Swami Vivekanand College of Agricultural Engineering & Technology and Research Station Indira Gandhi Krishi Vishwavidyalaya, Raipur - 492 012, Chhattisgarh, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.54894/JISCAR.40.1.2022.115831

Abstract

Proper assessment of irrigation water need for a canal command is required for long term planning and management of water resources. The present study was carried out in the Phulnakhara distributary command of the Puri main canal system distributed in Cuttack and Khurda districts of Odisha. During Kharif season, the Phulnakhara distributary command receives more than the required amount of irrigation water. However, during Rabi season, the canal does not flow at its full supply level as a result of which the total irrigation demand of the canal command area is not met leading to lower cropping intensity and poor crop productivity. The year-wise highest irrigation water demand in Kharif season was found to be 48646195 m3 during 2015-16 and the lowest was 22291100 m3 in 2017-18. Whereas the highest Kharif irrigation supply at the head regulator was 43402176 m3 during 2015-16 and the lowest was 29831328 m3 during 2013-14. The highest Rabi irrigation water demand was found to be 21700766 m3 during 2008-09 and the lowest was 9570257 m3 in 2017-18. Whereas the highest Rabi irrigation supply at head regulator was 26379648 m3 during 2008-09 and the lowest was 615168 m3 during 2009-10. As evident, there is a mismatch between the supply and demand in both the seasons and it is more prominent in the Rabi season. In order to bridge this gap, conjunctive use of canal water with groundwater is found to be a promising solution.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Agriculture Census Commissioner. (2015). All India Report on Agriculture Census 2010-11. Agriculture Census, Department of Agriculture Co-operation & Farmers Welfare, Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare, Government of India, New Delhi, India. 441 p.

Allen, R.G., Pereira, L.S., Raes, D. and Smith, M. (2004). Crop Evapotranspiration. Guidelines for Computing Crop Water Requirements. FAO Irrigation and Drainage Paper No. 56, FAO, Rome, Italy. 300 p.

Assistant Executive Engineer. (2018). Water Supply in Kharif and Rabi Record Register. Pratapnagari Irrigation Sub-Division, Department of Water Resources, Govt. of Odisha, Odisha. pp 1-161.

Brouwer, C., Prins, K. and Heibloem, M. (1989). Irrigation Water Management: Irrigation Scheduling. AGLW Training Manuals, Training Manual No. 4, FAO, Rome, Italy. 66 p.

Chadha, K.L. (2003). Handbook of Horticulture. Directorate of Information and Publications on Agriculture, Indian Council of Agricultural Research, New Delhi, India. 1031 p.

CWC. (2011). Support to the National Water Mission, National Action Plan on Climate Change, Central Water Commission (CWC), New Delhi, India. 147 p.

Deputy Director Agriculture (2017). Fully Revised Estimate of Area, Yield and Production of Different Crops Grown and the Associate Information of Cuttack District, Land Utilisation Statistics of Cuttack District, Office of the Deputy Director of Agriculture, Govt. of

Odisha, Cuttack, Odisha. 26 p.

Deshpande, T. (2016). Vital Stats: Status of Water Availability for Agriculture in India. PRS Legislative Research, Institute for Policy Research Studies, New Delhi, India.

Dhawan, V. (2017). Water and Agriculture in India. Background paper for the South Asia expert panel during the Global Forum for Food and Agriculture (GFFA), OAV - German Asia-Pacific Business Association, Hamburg, Germany. 27 p.

Directorate of Economics & Statistics (2018). Agricultural Statistics at a Glance 2018, Directorate of Economics and Statistics, Department of Agriculture, Cooperation & Farmers Welfare, Ministry of Agriculture & Farmers Welfare, Government of India, New Delhi, India. pp 287-307.

Gangwar, S. (2013). Water resource of India: From distribution to management. International Journal of Information and Computation Technology 3(8): 845-850.

ICAR. (2011). Handbook of Agriculture. Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), New Delhi, India. 1617 p.

Mishra, A., Verma, H.C. and Singh, R. (2008). Alternative rotational delivery scheduling for better water regime in canal command. Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering 134(2): 175-184.

Raul, S.K., Panda, S.N., Hollaender, H. and Billib, M. (2008). Sustainability of rice-dominated cropping system in the Hirakud canal command, Orissa, India. Irrigation and Drainage 57: 93-104.

Raul, S.K., Panda, S.N., Hollander, H. and Billib, M. (2011). Integrated water resource management in a major canal command in eastern India. Hydrological Processes 25: 2551-2562.

Downloads

Published

2022-07-23

How to Cite

DALAI, A., MISHRA, A., & TRIPATHI, M. P. (2022). Assessment of Crop Water Demand and Irrigation Water Supply in a Run-off-the-river Based Canal System. Journal of the Indian Society of Coastal Agricultural Research, 40(1). https://doi.org/10.54894/JISCAR.40.1.2022.115831

Issue

Section

Articles