Status of Women in Agriculture in the Coastal Districts of Odisha


Abstract views: 177 / PDF downloads: 53

Authors

  • ANIL KUMAR ICAR-Central Institute for Women in Agriculture, Bhubaneswar - 751 003, Odisha
  • J C JEEVA ICAR-Central Institute for Women in Agriculture, Bhubaneswar - 751 003, Odisha
  • B SAHOO ICAR-Central Institute for Women in Agriculture, Bhubaneswar - 751 003, Odisha
  • TANUJA S ICAR-Central Institute for Women in Agriculture, Bhubaneswar - 751 003, Odisha
  • D N SARANGI ICAR-Central Institute for Women in Agriculture, Bhubaneswar - 751 003, Odisha

Keywords:

Coastal districts, Gender gap, Livelihood, Odisha, Women in agriculture, Work participation

Abstract

Socio-economic profile of women in agriculture in the seven coastal districts of Odisha was studied, and the livelihood avenues available for them were analyzed. The socio-economic status were analyzed for the coastal districts as a whole and in rural areas separately and compared with the state average using a set of parameters. The coastal districts of Odisha have 16% of the geographical area and 33% of the human population (2011) of the state. In the coastal districts, the overall work participation ratio (WPR) was lower than the state average (37.9% vs 43.2%). In the coastal districts, 25.8% of the population were engaged in agriculture for employment which is lesser than the state average (31.5%). Female Agricultural WPR (FAWPR) was lower in the coastal districts by 9.2% (13.4 vs 22.6%) when compared with the state average. In the coastal districts, the female literacy was above 60% being as high as 80.6% in Jagatsinghpur. The gender gap in literacy in the coastal districts was 14.5% against the state average of 17.6%. Nutritional status of children in the coastal districts was better than the state average in all the three indicators (stunting, wasting and underweight) as compared to the state average. The household ownership of different livestock species was lower than the average for the state. A vast majority (82.3%) of the households in coastal areas drew a monthly income of less than INR 5,000 followed by 11.5% in 5,000-10,000 category and 6.1% of the households drew more than 10,000 as monthly income. This calls for concerted efforts for gender mainstreaming through better livelihood options. A better understanding of the present status of women can help in identifying the points of intervention and devising methodologies for better outcome of the projects.

References

Ann, M. O., Jennifer, L. M. and Holly, M. H. (2004). Gendered livelihoods in diverse global contexts: an introduction. Gender, Place & Culture 11(2): 205-208. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0966369042000218455.

Banerjee, S. and Roy, A. (2015). Determinants of female autonomy across Indian states. Journal of Economics, Business and Management 3(11): 1037-1040.

Census. (2011). Census of India 2011, Ministry of Home Affairs,

Government of India. http://censusindia.gov.in. (Accessed on 10.03.2019)

Choudhary, S. (2004). Invisible activities of rural women. Kurukshetra 52(9): 30-36.

Dyson,T. and Moore, M. (1983). On kinship structure, female autonomy, and demographic behavior in India. Population and Development Review 9(1): 35-60.

FAO. (2011). The State of Food and Agriculture 2010-11, FAO, United Nations, Rome.

Farid, K.S., Mozumdar, L., Kabir, M.S., and Goswami, U.K. (2009). Nature and extent of rural women’s participation in agricultural and non-agricultural activities. Agriculture Science Digest 29(4): 254-259.

Joshi, M. V. (1999). Women Rural Labourers: Problem and Prospects, APH Publishing Corporation, New Delhi.

Lal, R. and Khurana, A. (2011). Gender issues: the role of women in agricultural sector. Zenith International Journal of Business Economics and Management Research 1(1): 29-39.

Lipishree, D. (2015). Work participation of women in agriculture in Odisha. IOSR Journal of Humanities and Social Science 20(7): 66-78.

Livestock Census. (2012). 19th Livestock Census 2012, Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare, Government of India. http://www.dahd.nic.in/documents/statistics/livestock-census. (Accessed on: 15.01 2019)

NFHS-4. (2018). National Family Health Survey-4, 2015-16, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. http://rchiips.org/nfhs/districtfactsheet_NFHS-4.html (Accessed on 04.04.2019)

NFSM. (2018). National Food Security Mission. Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare, Government of India. https://www.nfsm.gov.in/nfmis/stateprofile/StateAPY.aspx (Accessed on 04.04.2019)

Ponnusamy, K. and Sendhil, R. (2015). Gender issues and livelihood pattern of migrant women labourers of farm families. Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences 85 (11): 1428–1434.

Rais, N.M., Solangi, A. and Sahito, H. (2013). Economic assessment of rural women involved in agriculture and livestock farming activities. Wudpecker Journal of Agricultural Research 2(4): 115-121.

Routray, P., Torondel, B., Clasen, T. and Schmidt, W.P. (2017). Women's role in sanitation decision making in rural coastal Odisha, India. Plos One 12(5):e0178042. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0178042.

Sajjad, H. (1998). Employment of Landless Labourers, BR Publishing Corporation, Delhi, India. 247 p.

Satyavathi, C., Bharadwaj, C. and Brahmanand, P. S. (2010). Role of farm women in agriculture: lessons learned. Gender, Technology and Development 14(3): 441-449. https://doi.org/10.1177/097185241001400308.

SECC. (2011). Socio Economic and Caste Census 2011, https://secc.gov.in. (Accessed on 10.03.2019)

Shiva, V (1991). Most Farmers in India are Women, FAO, New Delhi.

Shivaram. (1988). Women and Food Security, FAO, New Delhi.

World Bank. (2018). Poverty and Shared Prosperity 2018: Piecing Together the Poverty Puzzle. The World Bank, Washington DC, USA. 176 p. https://www.worldbank.org/en/publication/poverty-and-shared-prosperity

Downloads

Submitted

2019-08-01

Published

2019-08-02

Issue

Section

Articles

How to Cite

KUMAR, A., JEEVA, J. C., SAHOO, B., S, T., & SARANGI, D. N. (2019). Status of Women in Agriculture in the Coastal Districts of Odisha. Journal of the Indian Society of Coastal Agricultural Research, 37(1), 76-85. https://epubs.icar.org.in/index.php/JISCAR/article/view/92335