Standardisation and categorization of indigenous microorganisms (IMOs) for inoculated deep litter piggery in India


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Authors

  • SEEMA YADAV ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, Uttar Pradesh 243 122 India
  • P K BHARTI ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, Uttar Pradesh 243 122 India
  • G K GAUR ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, Uttar Pradesh 243 122 India
  • BHANITA DEVI ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, Uttar Pradesh 243 122 India
  • ABHISHEK ABHISHEK ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, Uttar Pradesh 243 122 India
  • N R SAHOO ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, Uttar Pradesh 243 122 India
  • RAJESH CHHABRA ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, Uttar Pradesh 243 122 India
  • ARUN SOMAGOND ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, Uttar Pradesh 243 122 India
  • MOHIT ANTIL ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, Uttar Pradesh 243 122 India

https://doi.org/10.56093/ijans.v90i4.104188

Keywords:

Bacteria, Fungi, Indigenous microorganisms, Inoculated deep litter housing

Abstract

The present experiment was conducted on standardisation and categorization of Indigenous Microorganisms (IMOs) in India for its future application as inoculum in inoculated deep litter housing of pigs. The cultivation of IMOs was accomplished in four steps, which involved use of half cooked rice, sugar sources, rice bran and soil at 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th steps, respectively. The cultivated IMOs at the end of each step from 1st to 4th were named accordingly as IMO-1, IMO-2, IMO-3 and IMO-4. The cultivation of IMOs was done in three groups based on the major sources of energy at 2nd step as control (brown sugar), treatment 1 (Jaggery) and treatment 2 (Molasses). The IMO-1 was obtained after 7 days which was confirmed based on the appearance of white coloured fungal mycelium in all the groups. The IMO-4 was considered as the final product of cultivation process which was confirmed by the presence of fungal mycelium interwoven in the soil. IMO-4 stage was further categorised in different microbial groups based on laboratory examination and only two categories of microbes were witnessed namely bacteria and fungi, none of yeast were found in those inoculums. Out of four types of bacterial colonies, IMB-3 confirmed the presence of Paenibacillus amylolyticus and IMB-4 as Enterococcus casseliflavus. The standardisation of IMOs as inoculum for deep litter housing was performed first time in India.

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References

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Submitted

2020-09-01

Published

2020-09-01

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How to Cite

YADAV, S., BHARTI, P. K., GAUR, G. K., DEVI, B., ABHISHEK, A., SAHOO, N. R., CHHABRA, R., SOMAGOND, A., & ANTIL, M. (2020). Standardisation and categorization of indigenous microorganisms (IMOs) for inoculated deep litter piggery in India. The Indian Journal of Animal Sciences, 90(4), 530-534. https://doi.org/10.56093/ijans.v90i4.104188
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