Polyhouse driven raised-temperature induces cichlid tilapia to breed during winter

Authors

  • B B JANA Emeritus Professor, Department of Fisheries Economics and Statistics, West Bengal University of Animal and Fishery Sciences, West Bengal, India
  • S LAHIRI Assistant Professor, International Centre for Ecological Engineering, University of Kalyani, Kalyani, West Bengal 741 235 India
  • S NANDY Research Fellow, International Centre for Ecological Engineering, University of Kalyani, Kalyani, West Bengal 741 235 India
  • P GHOSH Research Fellow, International Centre for Ecological Engineering, University of Kalyani, Kalyani, West Bengal 741 235 India
  • S K BAG Research Associate, International Centre for Ecological Engineering, University of Kalyani, Kalyani, West Bengal 741 235 India
  • S RANA Postdoctoral Research Fellow, International Centre for Ecological Engineering, University of Kalyani, Kalyani, West Bengal 741 235 India
  • J K BISWAS Postdoctoral Research Fellow, International Centre for Ecological Engineering, University of Kalyani, Kalyani, West Bengal 741 235 India
  • J N BHAKTA Postdoctoral Research Fellow, International Centre for Ecological Engineering, University of Kalyani, Kalyani, West Bengal 741 235 India
  • S JANA Emeritus Professor, Department of Fisheries Economics and Statistics, West Bengal University of Animal and Fishery Sciences, West Bengal, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.56093/ijans.v85i2.46618

Keywords:

Cichlid fishes, Climate change, Polyhouse, Polyhouse driven raised temperature, Tilapia breeding

Abstract

Two experiments were performed to examine the impact of global warming on the growth of some carps, and growth and breeding performance of tilapia in small holding tanks using polyhouse model for testing the green house driven raised-temperature on breeding performance of tilapia during winter months. Advanced fry of fish (rohu, bata, paku and common carp) as well as semi-adult male (2) and female (2) tilapia were reared for 91 or 98 days. The net weight gain of tilapia did not differ between outside and inside the polyhouse. Growth differences in rest of the fishes tested were not significant between enclosed and outside polyhouse. Tilapia held in enclosed polyhouse tanks bred and produced fry with numbers ranging from 28 - 36 / tank, whereas, there was no trace of breeding in tanks placed outside the polyhouse with ambient temperature. Water temperature remained to be significantly higher in the enclosed polyhouse compared to outside tanks. Raised water temperature of around 2.93°C inside the polyhouse over the ambient temperature outside was responsible for breeding activities of multiple spawner cichlid tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus. However, water quality parameters did not differ between the enclosed and outside polyhouse. It may be concluded that the benefit of closed polyhouse may be profitably used by the fish farmer for inducing breeding in tilapia and growth enhancement in other Indian fishes during winter months and colder region of the country in general.

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Published

2015-02-16

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Articles

How to Cite

JANA, B. B., LAHIRI, S., NANDY, S., GHOSH, P., BAG, S. K., RANA, S., BISWAS, J. K., BHAKTA, J. N., & JANA, S. (2015). Polyhouse driven raised-temperature induces cichlid tilapia to breed during winter. The Indian Journal of Animal Sciences, 85(2), 205–211. https://doi.org/10.56093/ijans.v85i2.46618