Livelihood Assessment of Fisher’s in Dal Lake, Kashmir


Abstract views: 126 / PDF downloads: 53

Authors

  • Shakir Ahmad Mir ICAR-Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Mumbai
  • Shekhar Nath Ojha ICAR-Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Mumbai-400061, Maharashtra, India
  • Pachampalayam Shanmugam Ananthan ICAR-Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Mumbai-400061, Maharashtra, India
  • Neha Wajahat Qureshi ICAR-Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Mumbai-400061, Maharashtra, India
  • Shivaji Dadabhau Argade ICAR-Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Mumbai-400061, Maharashtra, India
  • Shahid Gul ICAR-Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Mumbai-400061, Maharashtra, India
  • Velumani Thangavel ICAR-Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Mumbai-400061, Maharashtra, India

Abstract

The study investigates the livelihood conditions, vulnerability, and resilience of the Dal Lake fishers and their readiness and strength to withstand climate shocks and vulnerabilities. The study was conducted in 2019-2020 in three fishing villages of Dal Lake Kashmir, where the livelihood and vulnerability of fisheries-based livelihoods were assessed through a composite index development approach. The fishers of Dal Lake are moderately vulnerable to climate variability and changes. The status of the livelihood capitals of the fishers reveals that most of the capitals are of moderate type, however, the financial capital is poor horizontally among all the fishing villages. It was also found that the socio-economic conditions and resilience of the people are in very poor condition. The fisheries-related activities and policies are being side-lined because of giving more importance to tourism. The management of the lake is shared between the Fisheries & Tourism departments, and the Jammu and Kashmir Lakes Conservation and Management Authority (power). However, lack of coordination, less availability of resources, less priority to the fisheries sector, and lack of accountability hindered the desired outcomes. Proper management of the lake, coordination between the key stakeholders and fishers is very important and can be achieved through network governance.

Author Biographies

  • Shakir Ahmad Mir , ICAR-Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Mumbai

    PhD scholar in Fisheries Extension at ICAR-CIFE Mubai

     

  • Shekhar Nath Ojha , ICAR-Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Mumbai-400061, Maharashtra, India

    Principal Scientist,

    Fisheries Economics, Extension and Statistics Division, ICAR-Central Institute of Fisheries Education Mumbai, India-400061

  • Pachampalayam Shanmugam Ananthan, ICAR-Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Mumbai-400061, Maharashtra, India

    Principal Scientist,

    Fisheries Economics, Extension and Statistics Division, ICAR-Central Institute of Fisheries Education Mumbai, India-400061

  • Neha Wajahat Qureshi, ICAR-Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Mumbai-400061, Maharashtra, India

    Scientist,

    Fisheries Economics, Extension and Statistics Division, ICAR-Central Institute of Fisheries Education Mumbai, India-400061

  • Shivaji Dadabhau Argade, ICAR-Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Mumbai-400061, Maharashtra, India

    Scientist,

    Fisheries Economics, Extension and Statistics Division, ICAR-Central Institute of Fisheries Education Mumbai, India-400061

  • Shahid Gul, ICAR-Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Mumbai-400061, Maharashtra, India

    PhD Scholar, Fisheries Economics, ICAR-CIFE Mumbai

     

  • Velumani Thangavel, ICAR-Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Mumbai-400061, Maharashtra, India

    PhD Scholar, Fisheries Extension, ICAR-CIFE Mumbai

     

References

Allison, E. H. (2001). Big laws, small catches: global ocean governance and the fisheries crisis. Journal of International Development, 13(7), 933-950.

Allison, E. H., & Horemans, B. (2006). Putting the principles of the sustainable livelihoods approach into fisheries development policy and practice. Marine policy, 30(6), 757-766.

Allison, E. H., Béné, C., & Andrew, N. L. (2011). 12 Poverty reduction as a means to enhance resilience in small-scale fisheries. Small-scale fisheries management: frameworks and approaches for the developing world, 216.

Andrew, N. L., Béné, C., Hall, S. J., Allison, E. H., Heck, S., & Ratner, B. D. (2007). Diagnosis and management of small‐scale fisheries in developing countries. Fish and Fisheries, 8(3), 227-240.

Cooke, S. J., Allison, E. H., Beard, T. D., Arlinghaus, R., Arthington, A. H., Bartley, D. M., ... & Welcomme, R. L. (2016). On the sustainability of inland fisheries: Finding a future for the forgotten. Ambio, 45, 753-764.

Convention on Biological Diversity (2011). https://www.cbd.int/doc/reports/cbd-report-2011-en.pdf

Czúcz, B., Torda, G., Molnár, Z., Horváth, F., Botta-Dukát, Z., & Kröel-Dulay, G. (2009). A spatially explicit, indicator-based methodology for quantifying the vulnerability and adaptability of natural ecosystems. WL Filho & F. Mannke, Eds., Interdisciplinary Aspects of Climate Change, 209-227.

Daw, T., Adger, N., Brown, K., & Badjeck, M. C. (2009). 'Climate change and capture fisheries: potential impacts, adaptation and mitigation'in Cochrane, K., Young, CD, Soto, D. and Bahri, T.(eds) Climate change implications for fisheries and aquaculture: overview of current scientific knowledge.

DFID, U.K., (1999). Sustainable livelihoods guidance sheets. London: DFID, 445.

DoF (2020). Department of Fisheries, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India. Annual Report 2019–20.

DoT (2022), Department of Tourism Jammu and Kashmir, http://www.jktourism.jk.gov.in/List/List.aspx

FAO (2020), The state of world fisheries and aquaculture 2020. FAO, Fisheries and Aquaculture Department, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome

FAO (2022), The State of world fisheries and aquaculture 2022. FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture

Hajkowicz, S. (2006). Multi-attributed environmental index construction. Ecological economics, 57(1), 122-139.

Islam, M., Sallu, S., Hubacek, K., & Paavola, J. (2014). Vulnerability of fishery-based livelihoods to the impacts of climate variability and change: insights from coastal Bangladesh. Regional Environmental Change, 14(1), 281-294.

IPCC. (2007). Fourth assessment report. Intergovernmental panel on climate change. Secretariat. Geneva, Switzerland.

IMD Srinagar (2019). Indian Meteorological Department Meteorological-Centre Srinagar https://mausam.imd.gov.in/srinagar

LCMA (2022), Lake Conservation and Management Authority Jammu and Kashmir https://www.jklcma.in/

Macfadyen, G., & Allison, E. (2009). Climate change, fisheries, trade and competitiveness: understanding impacts and formulating responses for Commonwealth small states.

Meena, D. C., Dubey, R. K., Pal, R., Dubey, S. K., & Bishnoi, R. (2022). Assessment of Farmer’s Attitude and Social Vulnerability to Climate Change in the Semi-arid Region. Indian Journal of Extension Education, 58(3), 46-50.

Mir, S. A., Ojha, S. N., Ananthan, P. S., Qureshi, N. W., Argade, S. D., Gul, S., & Thangavel, V. (2022). Assessment of Fisheries and Management-Insights from Dal Lake, Kashmir. Indian Journal of Extension Education, 58(4), 60-65.

Olsson, P., Folke, C., & Berkes, F. (2004). Adaptive comanagement for building resilience in social–ecological systems. Environmental management, 34(1), 75-90.

Paavola J (2008). Livelihoods, vulnerability and adaptation to climate change in Morogoro, Tanzania. Environ Science Policy 11:642–654.

Pomeroy, R. S., & Williams, M. J. (1994). Fisheries co-management and small-scale fisheries: a policy brief.

Priyanka, P. S., & Devarani, L. (2022). Capturing community participation in rural tourism through PRA: A Study in Meghalaya. Indian Journal of Extension Education, 58(2), 35-41.

Purcell, S. W., & Pomeroy, R. S. (2015). Driving small-scale fisheries in developing countries. Frontiers in Marine Science, 2, 44.

Qureshi, N. W., Krishnan, M., Wani, S. A., Sivaramane, N., & Sundaramoorthy, C. (2017). Negative Externalities in Kashmir Lake Fisheries: Transformation in Species Patronage, Use Priorities and Policy. Indian Journal of Agricultural Economics, 72(1), 89-101.

Sallu, S. M., Twyman, C., & Stringer, L. C. (2010). Resilient or vulnerable livelihoods? Assessing livelihood dynamics and trajectories in rural Botswana. Ecology and Society, 15(4).

Serrat, O. (2017). The sustainable livelihoods approach. In Knowledge solutions (pp. 21-26). Springer, Singapore.

Smit, B., & Wandel, J. (2006). Adaptation, adaptive capacity and vulnerability. Global environmental change, 16(3), 282-292.

Smith, H., & Basurto, X. (2019). Defining small-scale fisheries and examining the role of science in shaping perceptions of who and what counts: a systematic review. Frontiers in Marine Science, 6, 236.

Stanford, R. J., Wiryawan, B., Bengen, D. G., Febriamansyah, R., & Haluan, J. (2017). The fisheries livelihoods resilience check (FLIRES check): A tool for evaluating resilience in fisher communities. Fish and fisheries, 18(6), 1011-1025.

Vincent, K. (2007). Uncertainty in adaptive capacity and the importance of scale. Global Environmental Change, 17(1), 12-24.

Wani, M. H., Baba, S. H., Yousuf, S., Mir, S. A., & Shaheen, F. A. (2013). Economic valuation and sustainability of Dal Lake ecosystem in Jammu and Kashmir. Knowledge systems of societies for adaptation and mitigation of impacts of climate change, 95-118.

Downloads

Submitted

31.05.2023

Published

05.06.2023

How to Cite

Livelihood Assessment of Fisher’s in Dal Lake, Kashmir. (2023). Indian Journal of Extension Education, 59(3), 48-53. https://epubs.icar.org.in/index.php/IJEE/article/view/137073

Most read articles by the same author(s)